Fentanyl crisis

Over 150 people die every day from overdoses related to synthetic opioids like fentanyl.

Fentanyl is a synthetic opioid that is up to 50 times stronger than heroin and 100 times stronger than morphine. It is a major contributor to fatal and nonfatal overdoses in the U.S. Fentanyl and other synthetic opioids are the most common drugs involved in overdose deaths. Even in small doses, it can be deadly.1

There are two types of fentanyl: pharmaceutical fentanyl and illicitly manufactured fentanyl. Both are considered synthetic opioids. Pharmaceutical fentanyl is prescribed by doctors to treat severe pain, especially after surgery and for advanced-stage cancer. 1

However, most recent cases of fentanyl-related overdose are linked to illicitly manufactured fentanyl, which is distributed through illegal drug markets for its heroin-like effect. It is often added to other drugs because of its extreme potency, which makes drugs cheaper, more powerful, more addictive, and more dangerous. 1

Illicitly manufactured fentanyl

Illicitly manufactured fentanyl (IMF) is available on the drug market in different forms, including liquid and powder1.

Powdered fentanyl looks just like many other drugs. It is commonly mixed with drugs like heroin, cocaine, and methamphetamine and made into pills that are made to resemble other prescription opioids. Fentanyl-laced drugs are extremely dangerous, and many people may be unaware that their drugs are laced with fentanyl.1

In its liquid form, IMF can be found in nasal sprays, eye drops, and dropped onto paper or small candies.1

1 All information contained on this page is from the below source.  Follow the link for more info. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2022, February 23). Fentanyl facts. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/stopoverdose/fentanyl/index.html

About Rachael’s First Week

Rachael’s First Week LIVE! is a program dedicated to protecting the lives of high school seniors and college freshmen as they transition into young adult women and men. 

These can be tumultuous years when peers often look to each other for guidance as they encounter novel and potentially dangerous situations, rather than engaging experienced mentors to provide solutions. 

The mission of Rachael’s First Week is to develop the decision-making skills of teens as they enter this time of monumental change in their lives.

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©2024 Rachael's First Week

©2024 Rachael's First Week

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